[Tuesday Scoop] Different Types Of Sugar

TYPES OF SUGAR

  • 26 Nov 2019
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    In my cakes, I prefer to use unrefined sugars, such as golden caster sugar and granulated sugar as they have more flavour, but do experiment with different types of sugars and sweeteners now available. The only time I would use white caster sugar is for meringues as it makes them really white.

     

    1. Caster Sugar

     

    caster sugar

     

    Most commonly used in cake making, especially for whisked sponges, creamed mixtures and meringues, as its small, regular grains ensure that it blends smoothly, giving an even texture. You can make vanilla sugar by adding two or three vanilla pods to a jar of caster sugar. Leave for two weeks to allow the vanilla to infuse. You can refill the jar as you use the sugar.

     

    2. Granulated Sugar

     

    granulated sugar

     

    Granulated sugar has a coarser texture than caster sugar and is best used in melting and rubbed-in methods. If used in a creamed mixture it will give a slightly gritty texture and speckled appearance and will reduce the volume of the cake.

     

    Read:-Top 10 Unique Cake Flavours

    3. Icing Sugar

     

    icing sugar

     

    Not generally used in cake mixtures as it will create a hard crust and reduce the volume of the cake, but it is essential in making Meringue Cuite. It’s most frequently used to make glacé icing and dust cooked bakes before serving.

     

    4. Muscovado Sugar

     

    muscovdo sugar

     

    Made from raw cane sugar, the colour and flavour vary with the molasses content. Light muscovado sugar can be used to make many cakes as it creams well. Use it for brown sugar meringues, using half-light muscovado and half caster sugar. Dark muscovado sugar can be overpowering but works well in gingerbreads and rich fruit cakes. To prevent muscovado sugar from going damp, put a sheet of kitchen paper in the bag or jar and seal.

     

    Read:-Eight Interesting Cake Facts You Must Know

    5. Demerara Sugar

     

    demerara sugar

     

    This is traditionally unrefined, but it has a lower molasses content than muscovado sugar. It is best suited to cakes made with the melting method to dissolve its large crystals and to be sprinkled on top of cakes or added to cheesecake bases for extra crunch.

     

    6. Nibbed Sugar

     

    nibbed sugar

     

    ‘Nibbed’ is an old-fashioned term meaning coarsely chopped. Nibs are the rough-shaped ‘shavings’ formed when sugar cubes are cut. I use it to top cakes before baking, but you can use crushed sugar cubes instead as nibbed sugar is difficult to get hold of.

     

    Read:-Different Types Of Cake Baking Methods

    7. Golden Syrup, Black Treacle And Honey

     

    black, golde, honey image

     

    Light, sweet golden syrup and darker, strong black treacle, which has added molasses, are both made from crystallized refined sugar. Nature’s equivalent, honey, is the oldest sweetener in the world. Use clear or runny honey in recipes as it dissolves more quickly.

     

    8. Malt Sugar

     

     

    Malt sugar is made from powdered malt that has been reduced into a syrup. Malt sugar is added to bread to add a sweet flavour and to aid the action of carbon dioxide.

     

    9. Condensed Milk

     

    condensed milk

     

    Condensed milk that has had half the water content removed and sugar added, sold in cans. I have used condensed milk as a sweetener in some recipes to give a fudgy flavour. When heated with butter and muscovado sugar it turns to a thick caramel, used in Millionaires’ Shortbread.

     

    Whenever you start with a recipe make sure you read it completely and always keep an eye on what kind of sugar is mentioned. Different types of sugars would give you a different type of end result.

     

    Read:-Baking Trends for 2020

    Posted in Tuesday Scoop